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A Reunion Of Sorts

Master Sgt. Timothy Boysun, 43rd Auxiliary Maintenance Unit F-22 Support Section Flight Chief, stands next to aircraft 78511, one of the first airframes he worked on when he first joined the Air Force in 1999, during the Sentry Savannah 15-2 exercise. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. George Solis)

Master Sgt. Timothy Boysun, 43rd Auxiliary Maintenance Unit F-22 Support Section Flight Chief, stands next to aircraft 78511, one of the first airframes he worked on when he first joined the Air Force in 1999, during the Sentry Savannah 15-2 exercise. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. George Solis)

Master Sgt. Timothy Boysun, 43rd Auxiliary Maintenance Unit F-22 Support Section Flight Chief, stands next to aircraft 78522, one of the first airframes he worked on when he first joined the Air Force in 1999, during the Sentry Savannah 15-2 exercise. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. George Solis)

Master Sgt. Timothy Boysun, 43rd Auxiliary Maintenance Unit F-22 Support Section Flight Chief, stands next to aircraft 78522, one of the first airframes he worked on when he first joined the Air Force in 1999, during the Sentry Savannah 15-2 exercise. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. George Solis)

The Air Dominance Center, Ga. -- As Master Sgt. Timothy Boysun, 43rd Auxiliary Maintenance Unit F-22 Support Section Flight Chief, did a foreign object damage walk on the first day of Sentry Savannah 15-2. He saw something in the distance that reminded him of the year 1999, when people were packing in the movie theaters to make "Star Wars Episode I: Phantom Menace" the top grossing film of the year, Britney Spears made her debut on the airwaves with "... Baby One More Time," and the Fox Broadcasting Company introduced us to Peter Griffin on "Family Guy."

For Boysun, 1999 was the year he turned 22-years-old, joined the Air Force and was assigned to Kadena Air Base's 67th Fighter Squadron as a F-15 Crew Chief. He was introduced to a couple of aircraft that would be some of the first he would work on in his Air Force career, the F-15C Eagle, tail numbers 78-0511 and 78-0522.

"These two aircraft are special to me because they remind me of my very first fighter squadron, the 67th FS "Fighting Cocks" Boysun said. "All the great things I was able to achieve while in that squadron and all the great people I worked with. "Legends of the 15 World" is what I'd call them. It also brings back the nostalgia of how the F-15 Eagle is a beast. Tried, tested, and true."

Boysun was able to experience this reunion on temporary duty assignment to Sentry Savannah 15-2, a training exercise that allows fighter pilots to participate in war simulations that depict what they would face in a real world scenario. Boysun is at Sentry Savannah with the 43rd AMU, while the F-15s are here as part of the 144th Fighter Wing from the California Air National Guard based in Fresno, Ca.

"It's not too common anymore to come across jets that I've previously worked, as most of them have moved to the guard units now," Boysun said. "Every now and then, like now, when you are exercising with the guard you get to see your old jets. It brings back a lot of good memories and good times."

Even though Boysun works with one of the most technologically advance airframes in the Air Force, the F-22, he wouldn't have any issues being assigned to a wing that supported the F-15. He said, "The F-15 itself is one of the best, if not the best fighter still around. Don't get me wrong, I really like the 22s, but would go back to a 15 squadron with no problems."